2019 HIPAA Updates

 

As we start this new year we must reflect what we have learned from 2018 in order to make 2019 a success.

The Office for Civil Rights (OCR) has gained momentum in enforcing HIPAA violations. With that said HIPAA is an ongoing process and once is not enough. It is not considered done unless it is documented. At the annual conference this past year, the OCR admitted they are adamant on ensuring your patient’s information is protected. Therefore, you must document your compliance. If you say you did something, they will ask for your documentation. If you do not have documentation, you will be fined.

Companies located in United States are now required to adhere to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) if they market goods and services to citizens of the European Union (EU). You must ensure the security of the data as well as inform visitors to your website how you intend to use their data. This must be clearly written in your privacy notice on website. This is not to be confused with your Notice of Privacy Practices that you give to your patients. If you plan on marketing to visitors from your website, you must offer them a free opt-out option. We could go on in more detail on this subject, but since many medical clinics do not market to international patients, you may contact us for more information.

Here are a few things to review and update as necessary:

  1. Risk analysis and risk management plan, this is your documentation to demonstrate what risks you have (had) and how you have mitigated them or plan to mitigate them.
  2. Replacing or updating any outdated technology, hardware and software require updates from time to time. You can be fined for utilizing outdated hardware/software that is no longer supported by the manufacturer.
  3. Adding a second authentication process for access to ePHI as well as for online personal accounts.
  4. HIPAA training, ensuring your employees understand how to protect your data is also part of this training.
  5. Making sure you have all of the necessary privacy and security policies, procedures, and forms in place. This means reading and dating them to demonstrate they were actually implemented.
  6. Retaining your documentation for the required time limit, including correspondence with patients that are considered to be part of their medical record.
  7. Reviewing your website, determining if your site collects any data and how it is transmitted and stored.

If you see something in your workplace that looks suspicious, tell your HIPAA Compliance Officer, you could be the one to prevent a data breach or stop a data breach from becoming a major breach (over 500 patient records). Keeping data secure is everyone’s business. Being mindful of our surroundings and educating others helps all of us in this crazy world we live in now!

To find out more about how our automated HIPAA compliance platform can help your organization click here:

https://arismedicalsolutions.com/aris-hipaa-service-automated-platform/

Or to schedule a demo click the contact us tab and scroll down.

“Simplifying HIPAA through Automation, Education, and Support”

 

Do you have all of your HIPAA training documented?

 

What do you know about HIPAA enforcement?
Just imagine you were investigated by CMS or the OCR, what would they find?
How confident are you in your medical and/or HIPAA documentation?
Do you have the appropriate documentation to protect your organization?

The Office for Civil Rights (OCR) is very serious about ensuring your organization is educating employees on patient rights and securing PHI. During a recent investigation in Florida an organization was fined $100K for each year they could not produce documented HIPAA training. The first year they only had 3 employees! They were fined for five years, $500K. Once you are under investigation, they review ALL of your documentation, not just what they originally requested. You do not want to end up being in the willful and wanton neglect category. This is where the big fines are calculated.

If you have a patient complaint or suffer a data breach, the best advice is to document, document, AND document! OH, did I mention… DOCUMENT? Next, cooperation. If they ask for something, give it to them. Nothing more, nothing less, but give them what they ask for. Show the OCR you are trying to do the right thing. After all, how would you like it if the information that was compromised was yours? Wouldn’t you want the organization to do what they could to stop the breach or prevent another one from happening?

Remember the MD Anderson in Texas fines? They had multiple devices lost containing unencrypted ePHI. They claimed that they were not obligated to encrypt its devices, and stated that the ePHI that was involved was for “research,” and thus was not subject to the HIPAA non-disclosure requirements. They challenged the OCR and the Judge ruled in favor of the OCR and MD anderson was ordered to pay $4,348,000 in civil money penalties. The quote from OCR Director Roger Severino: “OCR is serious about protecting health information privacy and will pursue litigation, if necessary, to hold entities responsible for HIPAA violations”.

At the NIST/OCR conference in Washington DC, the director along with other members of the OCR staff reminded organizations about enforcement. This is NOT going away. Patient information is extremely valuable to criminals. The days of just a slap on the wrist because you didn’t conduct risk assessment, conduct HIPAA training, or you can’t prove your HIPAA compliance is over. Every organization that has anything to do with patient information must get on board and understand HIPAA. There is NO certificate to prove you are HIPAA compliant, the proof is in your documentation. So I ask one more time… How well do you trust your HIPAA documentation?

To find out more about how our automated HIPAA compliance platform can help your organization click here:

https://arismedicalsolutions.com/aris-hipaa-service-automated-platform/

Or to schedule a demo click the contact us tab and scroll down.

“Simplifying HIPAA through Automation, Education, and Support”

 

Spoofing, Phishing, and how to avoid getting caught in the middle

After attending the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) annual webcast, many things were confirmed that we thought may have been rumors. First of all, medical offices are targets of hacking because you hold everything needed for identity theft.

What is identity theft? Most people think of it as their credit card being stolen, or even their tax returns. True, that is identity theft but there is also another component that is not often talked about. That is, assuming someone else’s identity for health care purposes. Imagine someone assumes your identity and has a surgery and “corrects” your medical record and changes your blood type. Then, you are involved in a car accident and receive a blood transfusion but it’s the WRONG blood. Yes, this can happen. We are not sure how often, but with the rise of medical records being stolen we could see this happen more often. Knowing where your data is located and how it is stored is a starting point in protecting this valuable information. Conducting a risk analysis and having an ongoing risk management is mandatory under HIPAA. During this process you will uncover potential vulnerabilities. Once you mitigate these risks, you may be able to avoid a data breach.

Protecting yourself and your organization is one in the same. Practice these safety tips at work and at home:

  • Make sure your operating system updates are current as well as your anti-virus and anti-malware.
  • Scan for viruses and malware after every update.
  • If you use personal devices to access ePHI or work files, be sure to use enterprise versions of anti-virus and anti-malware. Free versions typically are not robust enough.
  • NEVER use free Wi-Fi even if you are not accessing any patient information. You could pick up malware from someone that has spoofed the Wi-Fi network that you thought you were logging into.
  • NEVER click on links within emails that claim to be urgent or a free offer of some type. Typical phishing expeditions start in this manner. After you click, they ask for certain information they are lacking about you or they may ask for everything! Sometimes, this is merely a tactic to get you to go to a certain website and place malware on your computer and you never even know it.
  • NEVER click on a link within an email asking you to verify your identity. You wouldn’t show a stranger on the street your driver’s license just because they asked to see it, then why would you “verify” your identity with someone invisible in your email? Again, this is how spear phishing starts.
  • NEVER click on an attachment within an email unless you are expecting it, even if you know the person that sent it. Their email could have been hacked and you are being spoofed into thinking it is from them. This includes messages from FedEx, UPS, and the IRS. Best practices is to open your web browser and go to their website and sign in.
  • NEVER click on links in text messages unless you are expecting one, such as you just signed up for text messages from a service provider. Bank customers are being spoofed into clicking on links in text messages and taking you to what looks like your bank. Guess what… it’s NOT your bank but looks like it!

I have said this before… the World Wide Web (WWW) is the new Wild Wild West. The only difference is, in the old wild wild west you could see danger coming on the horizon and prepare. The World Wide Web, the dangers are there, but they are invisible.

Be safe out there!

To find out more about how our automated HIPAA compliance platform can help your organization click here:

https://arismedicalsolutions.com/aris-hipaa-service-automated-platform/

Or to schedule a demo click the contact us tab and scroll down.

“Simplifying HIPAA through Automation, Education, and Support”

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